Tag Archives: purpose

Alone and Lonely: A Few Quiet Mutterings

I have always enjoyed being by myself. But I have always used my alone time to interact with people and create. I like the validation and engagement that the internet can give, and it feels less exhausting than having to talk a lot with real people.

Being alone only became an issue for me when I began to feel lonely. This happened when I was studying my degree. I felt so different from everyone else. So out of tune with everyone there. It’s almost like people at university are vibrating more slowly – there’s no urgency, no sense of purpose or effervescence of spirit. I couldn’t connect with it. I couldn’t sink into that frequency. I was bullied a lot in school too. I was always different, but I tried very hard to fit in somewhere. As I get older, I care less and less about fitting in, but I am more lonely than ever.

I could exist quite contently with one or two rich, meaningful relationships with people. I haven’t had that in so long. I feel starved of the spirit of brilliant, interesting people, and like any starved thing, I’m becoming sluggish, malnourished, wilted.

I am clutching onto what I can to see me through, but I do sometimes feel as if a wallflower can be forgotten, and when it is, not even the rain drops that soak the bricks it clings to, will keep it from drying out.

Write a letter, start a revolution.

Dear reader,

I was talking with a friend I met through a poetry group on Facebook the other day. I was deciding to leave the platform and, as always, he had a novel suggestion. I had asked for his details because I wanted to stay in touch with people off the platform. If you look at my previous post Facebook, what have you done to us?, I decided to leave Facebook for various reasons, ethical, behavioural and psychological. His idea was this: ‘Let’s write a letter to each other’.

I thought to myself how peculiar that was and was meditating on the idea a bit. Why have we stopped writing letters? Well, the clear answer is that the internet does it faster. Sure, the internet has revolutionised communication but is that a good thing?

We used to take time to think and reflect on all the amazing things that happen to us in the weeks and months. Carefully, we’d curate a picture of our lives that showed all the most meaningful experiences we’d had lately in the two-fold process of consolidating and processing it for ourselves, and sharing with others.

I thought about what it would be like to receive a letter that was not about doctors appointments or bills, written in an individual font, addressed to me, the person, not me, the body, number or consumer. I came to the conclusion that writing letters to close ones is probably the most counter cultural, revolutionary thing young people can do in an age saturated by technology, and so coked up on its own sophistication, it’s losing any meaning or value it might once have had.

So here’s my challenge to you. Write three letters this month. Really think about your life and what has happened. Share it with those you care about but don’t see often enough. Tell me in the comments below that you posted it and that you’re taking up this counter revolution against technology. We need to slow down and think at the speed of a letter.

Share this article with friends and family. We’re re-writing the future, one hand-written letter at a time.

Yours Sincerely,

MI

Contact us if you have ideas or would like to share your thoughts on society.

3 Minute Book Review – ‘Rude’ – Katie Hopkins

Rude‘ is an eye-opening and inspiring look at a life which everyone has decided is driven by ‘evil’. Crude at times, but (as always) brutally honest, Hopkins takes us from where she began to where she is now. This might better be named ‘The making of Katie Hopkins’, than ‘Rude’, because rudeness really features at the bottom end of the scale. What shines through is honesty, an integrity (which at times has cost her dearly) and boundless ebullience. You wouldn’t believe the trials Katie faced to get where she is today, and the struggle has shaped everything she does now. Knowing you might have less than two years to live, having seizures every night from a brain tumour that’s killing you slowly, and making a huge number of personal mistakes, would make anyone with courage into a Hopkins. Why we give her so much crap for it I will never understand.

Anyway, once you read ‘Rude’ and understand the foundations that built the person we see today, it all makes sense. In a way, not only does this book make for an interesting insight into someone you might not necessarily understand, it is also a humbling experience. What so many of us think of as ‘hardship’ is relative. Katie drags you into the depths of yourself to consider your moral fibre. What should I be doing with my life? How important is it to say what I really mean? How can I learn from my mistakes?

Life is not everlasting. We could all reflect on our own laziness and life-inertia, and learn how to be people of action by listening to the wisdom of a life lived in the fast lane. So fast, in fact, that this book encapsulates the feeling you get before you go over your bike or crash a car. This book is the essence of a ‘life flashing before your eyes’ and ‘Rude’ will make you reflect deeply on how to make yours count as you consider the time you have left.